NRI's Addie Thornton honored with two challenge coins

While coordinating the SERPPAS Principals meeting in May, Colonel Schuliger, Commander of the 96th Civil Engineer Group at Eglin AFB and Mr. Tad Davis, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy, Installations and Environment and current DoD Principal Co-Chair for SERPPAS, honored Addie Thornton with two challenge coins for her work coordinating SERPPAS, and for the successful tour of Eglin Air Force Base.

 

NRI's Findley Brewster named U.S. Army Distinguished Quartermaster

Lieutenant General Jeffrey Buchanan Commander, U.S. Army North and Fort Sam Houston presented NRI's program manager Findley Brewster with the Distinguished Quartermaster award for lifelong support of the U.S. Army, military personnel and military families. The Distinguished Quartermaster program recognizes the efforts of private citizens in the communities surrounding Fort Sam Houston for enhancing the quality of life for soldiers and their families. 

 

NRI supporting statewide pollinator initiative

NRI partnered with other organizations like the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board and the Texas Wildlife Association to promote statewide land stewardship by launching a new campaign themed The Importance of Pollinators to Soil and Water Conservation in Texas.

 

Quail Decline Initiative April newsletter is here!

In the Quail Decline Initiative April newsletter we look back on a successful Fort Worth Quail Appreciation Day and share our new resources that will help you learn more about a lesser-known Texas quail species, the many plants that quail utilize for food and shelter, and how to conduct spring call counts with our video of the month. Coming up: Dallas Quail Appreciation Day in May!

April Conservation Matters is here!

In the April issue, we recognize the winners of the 2018 Texas Environmental Excellence Award in education, reflect on a year of accomplishments in our 2017 Annual Report, and highlight new resources about the importance of soils, irrigation, and riparian restoration in land stewardship. Also included are updates from our partner organizations and plenty of upcoming events you won't want to miss!

March Conservation Matters is here!

In the March 2018 edition, read about Texas' first federally endangered mussel species and what it means for the future of freshwater mussel conservation. Save the date for several upcoming programs and learn more about the economics of hunting, urban growth in Texas, and a talented wildlife artist taking up her mentor's mantle.

Dallas Center scientists study Texas' first federally endangered mussel species

Texas A&M AgriLife scientists are working to better understand the ecology and taxonomy of Texas freshwater mussels. These mussels play critically important roles in freshwater ecosystems and have beneficial impacts on human health, making them a high priority for conservation. Fifteen species have previously been classified as "threatened," and now one--the Texas hornshell mussel--is officially listed as "endangered."

February Conservation Matters is here!

In the February 2018 edition, read about a treasured herpetology tradition, how Kirby the quail is helping youth learn about stewardship, a few honorable mentions including an induction into the Texas Conservation Hall of Fame, a new generation of natural resource heroes and much more!

Texas Landowner’s Guide to the Endangered Species Act Published

Listing an animal or plant as “threatened” or “endangered” under federal law can impact the lives of landowners, ranchers, and farmers. Unlike states where much of the land is publicly owned, Texas is roughly 97 percent privately owned. For this reason, successful conservation efforts in Texas require private landowners and government agencies to work together.

Stewards of the Wild in Bryan/College Station

We're excited to announce that Bryan/College Station is home to the newest Stewards of the Wild chapter!

Stewards of the Wild is a young professionals program supporting the mission of Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. With member-led chapters in major cities throughout the state, Stewards of the Wild engages 21 to 45-year-old outdoor enthusiasts by providing exclusive access to Texas’ great conservation heroes and success stories. Every day, Stewards of the Wild across the state are connecting with thousands of their peers and building a community built on a shared love for Texas’ wild things and wild places.

December Conservation Matters published

Scroll through NRI's story map on the habitat requirements of Texas quails, learn about wild pigs and mast crops, read the latest report on habitat modeling and conservation of the Western Chicken Turtle and get to know the art behind bat science coming soon!

Published: Habitat Modeling and Conservation of the Western Chicken Turtle

The Western Chicken Turtle (Deirochelys reticularia miaria) is considered rare and declining throughout its range, although no population surveys have been conducted range-wide. Uncertainty regarding population status and perceived threats to habitat convinced the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to consider Endangered Species Act protection for the subspecies. The goal of this study was to inform the listing process by describing the biological and conservation requirements for Western Chicken Turtles.

Texas Master Naturalists connect on conservation of quail and other Texas wildlife

The Texas Master Naturalist Meeting was a great opportunity to connect with people who are passionate about the conservation of quail and other Texas wildlife and to build awareness for upcoming events like Urban Quail Appreciation Day and Quail Masters 2018. Members had a chance to meet Kirby—some for the second time—and learn more about the assessment of fine-scale vegetation selection by northern bobwhite quail in Texas. 

Fall Wild Pig Newsletter is Here!

In this sixth issue, landowners will learn about wild pigs and mast crops, view the best of the wild pig photo and video contest, read about the origin of the wild pig species and get a peek at trending articles and videos. 

Carter Smith talks about the Impact of the Texas Farm & Ranch Lands Conservation Program, Texas Agricultural Land Trust

In this Texas Agricultural Land Trust video, Carter Smith, Executive Director of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department explains the impact of the initial round of funding used to conserve working agricultural lands through the Texas Farm & Ranch Lands Conservation Program which provides grants for paid conservation easements to private land owners.

Fall Wild Pig Newsletter is Here!

In this third issue, landowners will learn about white-tailed deer management with considerations for wild pig control, read about considerations for the ethical harvest of wild pigs and get a peek at trending articles and videos.

Who’s been sleeping in my cave?

Researchers studying the impact of small mammals on cave habitats with endangered invertebrate species got a prickly surprise when they discovered large numbers of porcupines parading in and out of dozens of caves in the San Antonio area.

Three Military Bases, Ranges Added to Sentinel Landscape Partnership

The U.S. Departments of Defense (DoD), Agriculture and the Interior today announced the addition of three military bases to the Sentinel Landscape Partnership, a conservation effort begun in 2013 to improve military readiness, protect at-risk and endangered species, enhance critical wildlife habitat and restore working agricultural and natural lands in the Southeast and Midwest.

Spring Wild Pig Newsletter is Here!

In this first issue, land stewards will meet the Wild Pig team, read the seasonal spotlight, learn about new Wild Pig continuing education courses and landowner cooperatives, hear about upcoming programs and much more...

Partnership provides agricultural landowners conservation assistance in Nueces River Basin

Agricultural landowners and land managers in the 15-county region of the Nueces River basin have the opportunity to receive technical and financial assistance to help protect, improve and enhance their agricultural lands. Through this conservation stewardship, landowners will reduce runoff from their land and helping improve the water quality and quantity that flows into the Gulf of Mexico.

Testing the toughest plants for drought tolerance

A nine-month drought of epic proportion begins Saturday. This one, however, is restricted to a small plot of land in southern San Antonio that the Texas A&M Institute of Renewable Natural Resources (IRNR) uses for research. When the scientific findings become available about a year from now, they should be a boon to home and business owners who want lovely landscapes that require little or no watering.

Lead vs. steel? It's a draw in dove study shootout

Results released this week of a multiyear, peer-reviewed research project, conducted in Texas, indicate dove hunters using shotshells loaded with lead pellets enjoy no advantage in effectiveness over those using shotshells firing non-toxic steel pellets of similar or slightly larger size.

Conserving private lands conserves water

Former President and Texas native Lyndon B. Johnson once said: “Saving the water and the soil must start where the first raindrop falls.”

In Texas, where about 95 percent of the land is privately owned, and 83 percent of that land is rural farms, ranches and forests, it is essential that all Texans understand the interconnection of land and water to ensure the healthy stewardship of both, according to natural resource professionals.

In Perfect Harmony: Fort Bragg

Fort Bragg covers over 160,00 acres and is home to over 57,000 military personnel. If you think extraordinary training and military readiness are incompatible with a environmental protection and sustainability, think again. At Fort Bragg, the longleaf pine forests are flourishing and the training has never been better. Exploring North Carolina will show you this great American conservation story.

Mussels Matter: Research team increasing knowledge of mussels, txH2O

Though zebra mussels in Texas give mussels a bad name, other freshwater mussels are welcomed and needed in Texas waters.

Invasive zebra mussels, first confirmed in Texas in 2009, are causing major economic and environmental damages to Texas reservoirs. But unionid mussels, a family of freshwater mussels, are important indicators of water quality and stream health and play an important role in freshwater ecosystems, according to Dr. Charles Randklev, research scientist for the Texas A&M Institute of Renewable Natural Resources (IRNR).

Prescribed fire community of practice goes live

Most plant communities across North America are adapted to fire, and many plant and wildlife species are dependent upon fire for their survival. Fire suppression following European settlement in North America has caused these areas to dramatically change. Grasslands and prairies are being invaded by trees; savannas and open woodlands are becoming closed canopy forests; and prairie birds are declining with some species now threatened or endangered. It is critical that fire be restored to create and maintain the conditions necessary for the survival of our native plants and wildlife. Prescribed fire, sometimes also known as controlled burning, is the way land managers safely and effectively get fire back into these natural areas.

Clean air, clean technology take hold in South Texas

Increased production and economic stimulus are two of the most talked about outcomes emanating from South Texas' Eagle Ford shale. Given the arid region, water management has become a top priority for both operating companies and community stakeholders. In states where drilling activity is a fairly new commodity, hydraulic fracturing garners most of the attention. In the rapidly developing South Texas Eagle Ford, air quality is on the minds of both regulators and companies working the play.

Turkey hunting: What the biologists can teach you

A new generation of wild-­turkey researchers is seeking to answer questions about turkey population declines, habitat preferences, and geographic distribution. Their findings will influence turkey management for decades to come. But hunters can learn from them right now about where and how to hunt our most evasive gobblers.

Prescribed Burning School dates set for 2013

The Academy for Ranch Management has set the dates in 2013 for their annual Prescribed Burning School and Advanced Prescribed Burning School at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research-Sonora Station located on State Highway 55 between Sonora and Rocksprings.

Texas A&M IRNR researchers give presentations on GCWA research

The 2013 Golden-cheeked Warbler Symposium was held on January 25, 2013 in Austin, Texas, and was hosted and sponsored by Biodiversity Works. The symposium was also sponsored by Bandera Corridor Conservation Bank, Texas A&M University Institute of Renewable Natural Resources, and Zara Environmental LLC.  The following is the list of presentations given at the 2013 Golden-cheeked Warbler Symposium.